Foundation Subjects

Foundation Subjects

Design Technology 

Design Technology Curriculum at Springfield Academy

Design and Technology provides the pupils at Springfield Academy with an opportunity to tackle problems of a practical nature. The cross curricular nature of Design and Technology offers a setting for the children to apply knowledge and skills from a number of other subjects including engineering, maths and science.

Intention

Skills are developed using tools and techniques in designing and making artefacts and food products with an emphasis on healthy living. Working with a variety of materials aims to help children learn important life skills. Children learn independently and in groups, learning to co-operate, plan, design and make and evaluate their work. They learn to make their own decisions with help and encouragement. Design and Technology is taught in a block across the week to develop knowledge which is retained and built upon to enable children to achieve depth within their learning.

Implementation 

In Key Stage 1 the children will learn to design purposeful, functional and appealing products that are based on design criteria. They will make products by using a wide range of materials and develop the use of tools to cut, shape, join and finish. They will learn to evaluate products and suggest how it could be improved to be stronger, stiffer and more stable. They will learn to cook simple food with an emphasis on savoury dishes.

In Key Stage 2 the children will learn to design purposeful products that are aimed at particular individuals or groups. They will develop their ideas through detailed planning, evaluating product design, observational drawings and making prototypes. They will make products and learn how to use a wide variety of tools, equipment, materials and components. They will learn to design and cook food with an emphasis on savoury dishes.

Strong links with Haughton Academy are forged within Design and Technology with KS2 children accessing provision and specialist teaching.

Links are also made with the wider community with engaging engineering projects being run by local businesses.

Impact

Staff frequently monitor the attainment of children using the progression KPIs and use this to inform their teaching. Leaders support staff in delivering the curriculum through timely training and discussions. Leaders gather knowledge of how the curriculum is being taught through planning meetings, learning walks and pupil interviews where children can articulate and demonstrate the skills they have been taught. Regularly assessing what has worked well within a particularly area and what challenges have been faced, we are able to develop and adapt the curriculum so that Design and Technology can be delivered effectively for all children.

MFL 

Intent

The intention of the MFL curriculum at Springfield Primary Academy is that children are taught to develop an interest in learning other languages in a way that is enjoyable and stimulating. We encourage children’s confidence, we strive to stimulate and encourage children’s curiosity about language. In planning with actively plan links to develop their awareness of cultural differences in other countries, though, British values, curriculum enrichment and cultural capital opportunities. We strive to embed the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing necessary to enable children to use and apply their MFL learning in a variety of contexts and lay the foundations for future language learning.

Implementation

Our MFL curriculum is designed to progressively develop children skills in languages, through weekly lessons. Children progressively acquire, use and apply a growing bank of vocabulary organised around topics. To ensure coverage and progression across school, we use a scheme of learning – Rising Stars Eurostar’s. Through fostering links within our secondary setting, we are able to provide our children with the opportunity to be taught by a subject specialist- both in French and Spanish. This has further embedded the enthusiasm for learning a new language and a contextual perspective.

Children are encouraged and supported to develop their speaking and listening skills through conversational work, singing activities and games. As confidence and skill grows, children record their work through pictures, captions and sentences. 

How it is assessed:

We strive to ensure that our pupil’s attainment is in line or exceeds their potential when we consider the varied starting points of all our children. The learning challenges used and progression girds used to plan and teach MFL, ensure that children are accessing work at age related expectations, with regular opportunities to be challenged through higher-level objectives.

Impact

Our MFL curriculum will ensure all pupils develop key language learning skills, as set out by the national curriculum, as well as a love of languages and learning about other cultures. These are as follows:

MFL is monitored by subject leaders throughout all year groups using a variety of strategies such as book scrutinises, lesson observations, staff discussions and pupil interviews.  Feedback is given to teachers and leaders use the information to see if the children know more and remember more.

PSHE

Our PSHE curriculum aims to give the pupils at Springfield Academy the knowledge to understand the choices they face as they grow up and the skills to make safe choices as they prepare to become adults.

Our curriculum aims to develop skills and attributes such as resilience, self-esteem, risk-management, team work and critical thinking in the context of learning grouped into four core themes: Citizenship and Economic Well-being, Relationships Education / Growing Up, Healthy Lifestyles and Staying Safe.

Healthy lifestyles include being prepared for puberty, drugs education (especially smoking and alcohol) and sexual health.

In relationships we look at positive friendships but also explore bullying/controlling behaviour and what to do if they are being treated in a way they do not like.

Staying safe includes staying safe online.

Pupils also study citizenship issues to help to develop and express their own opinions. Topics include understanding and tolerating people who are different from them and developing a basic understanding of our political system and British values.

Across the school, topics and lesson content are adapted to the needs of each group and the school is skilled at making sensitive issues accessible to pupils in a safe and supportive environment.


History

History, at Springfield Academy, forms an integral part of the curriculum. We believe the study of history inspires children’s curiosity, encourages them to ask critical questions and enables them to have a better understanding of the society in which they live and that of the wider world. They will work as historians where they will critically analyse different sources of information. It also helps children gain a sense of their own identity within a social, political, cultural and economic background. Because of this, we feel it is important for the subject to be taught discretely as well as being incorporated within other subjects where appropriate and relevant.

Intention 

The history curriculum at Springfield Academy makes full use of the resources within the immediate and wider local area enabling children to develop a deep understanding of the rich history of their locality.

Topics are informed by the national curriculum and are sensitive to children’s interests, as well as the context of the local area. The history curriculum at Springfield Academy is carefully planned and structured to ensure that current learning is linked to previous learning and that the school’s approaches are informed by current pedagogy. In line with the national curriculum 2014, the curriculum at Springfield Academy aims to ensure that all pupils: Gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world which helps to stimulate pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past; Are encouraged to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement; Begin to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Implementation 

As with other subjects, History is taught in weekly blocks throughout the year, so that children achieve depth in their learning. Teachers have identified the key knowledge and skills of each topic and consideration has been given to ensure progression across topics throughout each year group across the school. By the end of year 6, children will have a chronological understanding of British history from the Stone Age to the present day. They are able to draw comparisons and make connections between different time periods and their own lives. Interlinked with this are studies of world history, such as the ancient civilisations of Greece and the Mayans.

Cross curricular outcomes in history are specifically planned for, with strong links between the history curriculum and morning literacy lessons enabling further contextual learning. The local area is also fully utilised to achieve the desired outcomes, with extensive opportunities for learning outside the classroom embedded in practice.

Emphasis is placed on analytical thinking and questioning which helps pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world and are curious to know more about the past.

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) follows the ‘Development Matters in the EYFS’ guidance which aims for all children in reception to have an ‘Understanding of the World by the end of the academic year.

Impact

Staff frequently monitor the attainment of children and use this to inform their teaching. Leaders support staff in delivering the curriculum through timely training and discussions. Leaders gather knowledge of how the curriculum is being taught through planning meetings, learning walks and pupil interviews where children can articulate and demonstrate the skills they have been taught. Regularly assessing what has worked well within a particularly area and what challenges have been faced, we are able to develop and adapt the curriculum so that History can be delivered effectively for all children.



Art & Design

At Springfield we place emphasis on the importance of art and design in allowing curiosity, creativity and self expression to develop alongside resilience, confidence and critical thinking skills.

Intention

Art and Design is a  skills based curriculum, allowing children to develop with individuality and creativeness. Art and design plays a vital role in creating a wide range of products and artwork, these skills can be transferred to other areas of the curriculum and aid learning.

Art and Design is taught in a block across the week to ensure that knowledge is retained and built upon to enable children to achieve depth within their learning.

Implementation

In Key Stage 1 the pupils will learn to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products. They will use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination. They will  develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space. They will learn about the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers, describing the differences and similarities between different practices and disciplines, and making links to their own work.

In Key Stage 2 the pupils will develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

They will continue to  develop sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas  to improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing, painting and sculpture with a range of materials (for example, pencil, charcoal, paint, clay)

They will learn about great artists and architects in history.

Impact

Staff frequently monitor the attainment of children using the progression KPIs and use this to inform their teaching. Leaders support staff in delivering the curriculum through timely training and discussions. Leaders gather knowledge of how the curriculum is being taught through planning meetings, learning walks and pupil interviews where children can articulate and demonstrate the skills they have been taught. Regularly assessing what has worked well within a particularly area and what challenges have been faced, we are able to develop and adapt the curriculum so that art and design  can be delivered effectively for all children.

Religious Education

At Springfield Academy, we believe that it is vital for all our pupils to learn from and about religion, so that they can understand the world around them. Through Religious Education, pupils develop their knowledge of the world faiths, and their understanding and awareness of the beliefs, values and traditions of other individuals, societies, communities and cultures. We encourage our pupils to ask questions about the world and to reflect on their own beliefs, values and experiences. Our Religious Education curriculum is enhanced further with trips to places of worship in our local area where possible. We use the agreed Darlington Religious Education syllabus as the basis for our curriculum.

Intention

Our RE curriculum is rooted in the principles set out in the Darlington Agreed Syllabus as is the legal requirement for the teaching of Religious Education. By the end of each Key Stage, students are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study. They should also have been given opportunities to develop positive attitudes to their own and others’ beliefs and values, recognising and respecting difference.

Pupils will develop religious literacy by:

In this Agreed Syllabus these are called the 3 elements of RE. They are interlinked and enable pupils to make good progress in RE.

This syllabus provides for a developmental approach to RE. Continuity and progression is achieved by building on the knowledge, understanding and skills that pupils gain across and between Key Stages.

Pupils make progress in RE through:

Implementation 

Religious Education is taught in weekly blocks so that children can develop depth to their learning. In some classes RE is taught on a weekly basis due to the needs of the children Teachers plan these blocks of learning with the three elements of RE, identified earlier, interwoven into their lessons. We use enquiry questions identified in the Agreed Syllabus to help produce a balanced Scheme of Work that enables pupils to develop an understanding of the differing dimensions in the study of religion.

In Key Stage 1 children are taught units based around the core religions of Christianity and Hinduism. In lower Key Stage 2 children are taught units based around the core religions of Christianity and Sikhism. In upper Key Stage 2 children are taught units based around the core religions of Christianity and Islam.

Impact (So What?)

Staff frequently monitor the attainment of children and use this to inform their teaching. Leaders support staff in delivering the curriculum through timely training and discussions. Leaders gather knowledge of how the curriculum is being taught through planning meetings, learning walks and pupil interviews where children can articulate and demonstrate the skills they have been taught. Regularly assessing what has worked well within a particularly area and what challenges have been faced, we are able to develop and adapt the curriculum so that RE can be delivered effectively for all children.



Computing

Computing Curriculum at Springfield Academy

Many of the occupations that people work in today, simply did not exist ten years ago. The ICT/computing curriculum that was delivered to children ten years ago could not have predicted the rise of the podcast, the vlogger trend or the streaming of games with a walkthrough guide. For this reason, we believe that technology and computing should be open ended and have roots of problem solving. We cannot foresee what jobs will be available to the children that we teach. One thing that we do know, is that technology is an integral part of everyday life.  We hope to prepare our children for a future in an environment which is shaped by technology. Our main priority of computing is to engage children with cross-curricular learning through interacting with technology. We try to ensure that technology supports learning when necessary and when it can add substance to the learning to enhance it further. We aim to develop confident, independent learners who are able to plan, design, create, program and evaluate information through the use of ICT. As well as the benefits of ICT we are also aware of the risks, this is why we prepare our children to stay safe online through the use of e-safety awareness sessions and safer internet days.

Intention

At Springfield Academy, we recognise that children are living within an increasingly technological world and therefore we aim to develop confidence and knowledge in this area. Computing skills are taught specifically during weekly computing sessions and then applied across the curriculum to enhance other subjects. Alongside computing skills, we regularly discuss and explore internet safety and the importance of why we need to keep ourselves safe of the internet. As children leave primary school, we aim for children to transfer this knowledge and have the confidence to implement these skills in everyday situations.

Implementation

We have a variety of technological devices within school; from Chromebooks to iPads to desktop computers in each classroom and in an ICT suite. All classes are encouraged to use all of these devices to ensure children are proficient across a multitude of platforms. We cannot legislate for what will be the next big technology and therefore using the transferable skills with each device enables children to become more intuitive when using a never-before-seen device. Every class has a weekly timetabled opportunity to use the computers in the ICT suite. These sessions are to teach the skills that are required to interact and utilise the technology across all subjects. We encourage staff to incorporate technology throughout the wider curriculum and use these skills to research and present writing in a variety of ways. Each class has access to Smart boards and teaching is delivered using this technology. Across the school, we follow a progression of skills through 3 main areas; digital awareness, digital skills and programming.

In Key Stage 1, children are beginning to develop their computing skills through using the language of computing such as algorithm and debugging. allows the children to explore the terms with much more meaning. Interacting with a range of technology such as BeeBots, computers and iPads, enables the children to learn this language in a real-life situation and it encourages the children to use the correct terms.  To encourage children to recognise the value of using technology, we teach skills such as logging on with their own password and the importance of only using their own password and username. Children develop their skills in many ways such as; navigating around a computer to use a range of Microsoft programmes; interacting with applications on iPads to support their learning in other subjects. The use of the internet to search images is incorporated alongside internet safety to reinforce the importance of staying safe online, including reporting anything that they find that they are unsure of.

In Key Stage 2, children build upon previous work and the progression of skills is continued. The foundations that have been laid from Key Stage 1 enables children to transfer these skills to the use of other devices - the use of Chromebooks is much more prevalent. Children are encouraged to keep their passwords safe and the work on online safety supports the investigation into the reliability of internet searches. Programming is developed further within this key stage and children are encouraged to problem solve with more independence and resilience to achieve a desired outcome.

Impact

Staff frequently monitor the attainment of children using the progression KPIs and use this to inform their teaching. Leaders support staff in delivering the curriculum through timely training and discussions. Leaders gather knowledge of how the curriculum is being taught through planning meetings, learning walks and pupil interviews where children can articulate and demonstrate the skills they have been taught. Regularly assessing what has worked well within a particularly area and what challenges have been faced, we are able to develop and adapt the curriculum so that Computing can be delivered effectively for all children.


Geography

At Springfield Academy we believe that Geography helps to provoke and provide answers to questions about the physical and human aspects of the world. Geography inspires curiosity and fascination about the world and its people, within children.

Intention 

At Springfield Academy we aim to equip our children with knowledge about people, resources and physical and human environments, in and around our local area of Darlington and the wider world. As children progress, their growing knowledge will help them deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and use of different landscape. We hope the children will leave Springfield Primary Academy, with geographical knowledge, understanding and skills, which will allow them to explain how the earth’s features, both in their local area and the wider world, are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

Implementation

Geography at Springfield Academy is taught in blocks throughout the year, so that children can achieve depth in their learning. Teachers have identified the key knowledge and skills of each blocked topic and consideration has been given to ensure progression across topics throughout each year group across the school. We do this where possible using cross-curricular links, which are relevant, engaging and interesting for our children.

In Key Stage 1, children will begin to use simple maps to move around their school and local area whilst creating and following routes. They will begin to draw their own maps, using basic symbols and be introduced to simple compass points. Children will begin to develop their understanding of their local area through fieldwork looking at both physical and human features whilst then moving their learning onto the wider world. They will look at the United Kingdom as a whole and also the 7 continents and 5 oceans.

In Key Stage 2, children continue to develop their mapping skills by following progressively more complex routes. They will continue to draw their own maps with the introduction of OS map symbols. As they progress throughout this key stage children well develop the use of 8 figure compass and 6 figure grid references. Children will consolidate their knowledge of the United Kingdom looking into both physical and human at a greater depth. They will extend their learning to focus on Europe and North and South America. Using well planned cross curricular to understand the human and physical features of these countries.    

Impact

Staff frequently monitor the attainment of children using the progression KPIs and use this to inform their future teaching. Leaders support staff in delivering the curriculum through timely training and discussions. Leaders gather knowledge of how the curriculum is being taught through planning meetings, learning walks, monitoring of books and assessment grids along with pupil interviews where children can articulate and demonstrate the skills they have been taught. Regularly assessing what has worked well within a particularly area and what challenges have been faced, we are able to develop and adapt the curriculum so that Geography can be delivered effectively for all children.


PE

Motivating students to maintain a balance between their school work and physical education is key in developing an ‘active mind’. Physical education is an essential part of healthy living for people of all age groups, especially those going to school. This is because school life is full of stress and anxiety at every stage. Several researches have proved the importance of physical activities of students in a school environment. Thus, we are now encouraging students to take part in more regular physical education. Scientifically, these activities have been proven to be as important as doing school work. PE and sport have always been an integral part of our learning environment at Springfield. Through good quality PE lessons, children are inspired to succeed and, at times, excel in competitive sport and physical activities. PE and sport are differentiated in school, with key skills that can be transferred between a range of sports being learnt in curriculum PE, and sport-specific skills learnt in after-school clubs, or discrete sessions held in the run-up to a particular sporting event.

Intention

At Springfield Academy, we use physical education to teach the students how to improve the quality of their life. Physical activities and exercises boost their stamina which can make them fall in love with their intelligence and abilities. Used as a way of enhancing an individual’s ability to concentrate and maintain focus, we aim to draw pupils’ attention away from the modern-day culture of technology. In today’s world, it is very easy to eat a high amount of unhealthy foods, so physical education at Springfield helps in preventing obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure in children. As school life is so hectic, our aim is to ensure that all of our children are given plenty of opportunities to relieve any academic stress and anxieties, and relax their bodies. Through accessing high-quality physical education, we hope to make pupils happy, confident and healthy.

Implementation

Each class has a timetabled slot of one hour of PE each week, and each class also swim for half an hour each week, with the class split and rotated throughout the year.

Curriculum PE

Curriculum PE provides all children with opportunities to become physically confident, to develop competence to excel, to become physically active and to engage in a wide range of activities. PE lessons focus on developing transferable skills, which can then be applied to a number of different sports, and activities as the children develop.

Through the year groups, children will cover the following units: games, invasion games, gymnastics, dance, striking and fielding games, athletics and outdoor and adventurous activities. These units cover a half term each. Within each unit, sessions are broken down so that children progress through ‘Developing Skills’, ‘Making and Applying Decisions’ and ‘Developing physical and mental capacity’ activities. Each individual session shows children, and allows them to lead, warm-ups and stretches, whilst ensuring that pupils are made aware of the importance of these. The sessions enable all children to be physically active for at least 75% of the time, and skills are built up until they can be demonstrated in various situations at the end of a lesson. A cool-down then takes place, and children are constantly reminded of the benefits of this part of the session.

Springfield follow the core tasks for PE, provided by the PESSCL (Physical Education School Sport and Club Link).

In Key Stage 1, there is a focus on developing fundamental movement skills; increasing competence and confidence in agility, balance and coordination. Children are encouraged to work individually, in pairs and in small groups to apply their skills in different contexts, and are given opportunities to engage in competitive and co-operative physical activities. These activities will increase in challenge as the children work their way up the school. Through PE lessons, children are taught how to master basic movements, such as running, jumping, throwing and catching, and they begin to apply these in to game situations. They participate in team games, with the aim of developing simple tactics for attacking and defending, and also perform simple dances, with a focus on the creation of basic movement patterns.

In Key Stage 2, pupils continue to develop a broader range of skills, and apply these in more challenging activities. There is an increased focus on communicating, collaborating and competing with each other, and they are given increased opportunities to evaluate their performances and identify how they could improve, as well as celebrating their own successes. Pupils further their running, jumping, throwing and catching skills and use them in combination in more complex activities. In Upper Key Stage 2, children begin to apply learnt skills to more competitive games, and may play different versions of games such as basketball, cricket, hockey, rounders and tennis. In gymnastics, children are taught how to develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance, and in dance are taught how to use different movement patterns. In better weather, children take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges within a team.

PE lessons are usually taught by the class teacher. However, Springfield are in the lucky position of having PE specialists from Middlesbrough Football Club in each week to teach PE. They are currently working in Year 5 and Year 6. At different points within the year, some classes also receive professional coaching in some units, provided through our link with Darlington School Sport Partnership.

Swimming

Each class has a half-hour timetabled slot in the Education Village swimming pool. Sessions are taught by qualified swimming teachers/coaches. Children in EYFS and KS1 use the hydrotherapy pool, which is a more suitable depth and temperature for the younger children, whereas the KS2 children use the 25m pool. Able swimmers are encouraged to swim lengths, and less competent swimmers swim widths across the shallower end of the pool. Pupils begin by developing movements in the water, to build confidence and encourage physical competence. They are then encouraged, through the teaching of key skills, progressing in complexity through the years, to swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25m by the time they leave Springfield. They are taught the techniques to become comfortable within frontcrawl, backcrawl and breaststroke, and are given opportunities to develop movement skills related to the butterfly stroke. An integral part of swimming lessons is to also develop water safety and self-help skills. In Year 6, children are given opportunities to also perform safe self-rescue. 

Sport

As part of our link with Darlington School Sport Partnership, we are automatically entered into a number of competitions and festivals throughout the school year. Teams are chosen based on skills shown in PE lessons, or in trials put on for some events. There are also clubs which run that focus on a sport which is upcoming on the competition calendar. These competitions are friendly, and promote team skills and sportsmanship. We celebrate our success at these events at our annual Sports Presentation evening, which is held every July. Sports which Springfield Academy children regularly compete in include tag rugby, cross-country, sports hall athletics, table tennis, basketball, football, swimming, dance and athletics. Following sports competitions, the school actively encourage children to join local sports clubs to further their skills in particular activities.

Extended Schools

Springfield’s extended schools programme has always been extensive, and there are a range of sports which are included within the weekly timetable. These clubs allow staff to select children for teams, whilst also ensuring that skills levels are maintained at a high level to give children the best chance of success at the competitions and festivals. After school sporting clubs include swimming, football, performing arts and running, whilst there are also lunch time clubs which focus on upcoming competition sports.

Impact

Staff frequently monitor the attainment of children in physical education lessons through assessment against the core task expectations. This is then used to inform future teaching. Leaders, both internal and external, support staff in delivering the curriculum through timely discussions and training. The subject leader gathers knowledge of how the curriculum is being taught through learning walks, pupil interviews and staff feedback forms. Regularly assessing what has worked well within a particular area of physical education, alongside what challenges have been faced, enables staff to develop and adapt the curriculum so that lessons can be delivered effectively to all children. Swimming is regularly assessed by the swimming teachers, and data is shared with leaders every term. Through the development of skills across physical education, we hope that our children can begin to flourish at inter-school competitions as well as in lessons.

Music

The Education Endowment Fund indicates that the impact of arts participation is positive, and improved outcomes have been identified in the core subjects English, mathematics and science. Research suggests that arts participation has a greater effect on average for younger learners and, in some cases for disadvantaged pupils and benefits have been found in both primary and secondary schools. Wider benefits include more positive attitudes to learning and increased well-being.

At Springfield Academy, we aim to build a musical curriculum which develops learning and results in the acquisition of knowledge and improved well-being.  All staff promote a love of music and singing across a broadened curriculum.

At Springfield Academy, music is taught as a class subject and in cross-curricular way. The aim is to develop each child’s musical potential by giving opportunities for self-expression and creativity.

We aim to make music an enjoyable learning experience. Singing lies at the heart of good music teaching and joining together during collective worships is an important part of school life.

Intent

It is our aim that our pupils will develop an ability to listen to, and appreciate a wide variety of music, including different styles, periods and cultures.

Opportunities will be provided throughout the year to explore and express ideas and feelings about music, in a variety of ways, for example through dance as well as exploring a range of musical elements, for example: pitch, tempo and dynamics.

Throughout each unit of work the children will have opportunities for active involvement in creating and developing musical ideas using voices and instruments.

Class teachers will support the children to develop a sense of group identity and togetherness through composing, rehearsing and performing music with others, to an audience, this will be achieved through class assemblies and other musical performances throughout the year.

We hope that the children will leave Springfield Academy having had access to a wide variety of musical genres and developed an enjoyment of music which will always be part of their lives.

Implementation

Class teachers use the Charanga Musical School programme to follow a week- by–week scheme of work for each year group. The planning follows the National Curriculum guidelines to ensure that progression is maintained across the key stages and that the correct skills, age appropriate, are taught.

Early Years Foundation Stage

We teach music in our Nursery and Reception classes as an integral part of the topic work covered during the year. We relate the musical aspects of the children’s work to the objectives set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework which underpin the curriculum planning for children aged three to five. Music contributes to a child’s personal and social development. Counting songs foster a child’s mathematical ability and songs from different cultures increase a child’s knowledge and understanding of the world.

Key stage 1 Pupils are taught to:

Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes Play a range of percussion instruments Listen with concentration and understanding to a range of high-quality live and recorded music Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Key stage 2 Pupils are taught to:

Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music

Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory

Use and understand staff and other musical notations Appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians Develop an understanding of the history of music.

Peripatetic teachers visit weekly and teach individual instruments to those children who wish to learn them; a love of playing an instrument is promoted and encouraged in their ability to do so as a form of expression.

Children will access extra-curricular musical participation opportunities such as choir, Harvest Festival, Christingle and singing in the local community.

Impact

Children will achieve age related expectations in music at the end of their cohort year. Children will retain knowledge that is pertinent to music. Children will participate in wider musical activities. Opportunities for improved well-being and confidence will be increased. Children will gain wider audience performance experience. Children will have heightened awareness of musical opportunities available in and outside of school in the hope that access will be increased.